Goodwill words: A reminder to stay young and try something new.


Sometimes my notes to elders turn into mini-pep talks and reminders we still have control over how are days are spent.

It’s quotes like today’s that help move the message forward. So if/when I’m at a loss for words, there is always a quote or a calendar page or a photo from my camera roll to add impact and/or insight that I generally lack.


A plug for Love for Our Elders.
Tagline: We’re fighting loneliness with love, one letter at a time.

Am hoping the card spurs a little interest and action.

image by John Hain/Pixabay

Thanks for visiting. I always appreciate the folks who press the ‘Like’ button to let me know the post arrived safely.

I am always happy to steer you to letter-writing destinations and resources on the Web. Just let me know what you need.

Goodwill words: Laughing at imperfection.


Using another calendar page to spice things up for another ‘elder’.

Nothing like human foibles to evoke a laugh or two.


A plug for Love for Our Elders.
Tagline: We’re fighting loneliness with love, one letter at a time.

Just a reminder: This is not a ‘see what I did? You should too! project. This is me following Austin Kleon’s suggestion to ‘share something small…’.

Image by Mohamed Hassan from Pixabay 

Thanks for visiting.

I am always happy to steer you to letter-writing destinations and resources on the Web. Just let me know what you need.

Goodwill words: Hoping this recipient wasn’t in retail.

Nothing like my own design ineptitude
to play into the note’s featured image…

One of the other challenges to writing to an unnamed ‘other person’ is the possibility of offending someone.

But in the end, I shrug and have faith the note reaches someone who might a) find the humor b) have pity on me…as a human, a writer, a delusional who hopes to amuse.


A plug for Love for Our Elders.
Tagline: We’re fighting loneliness with love, one letter at a time.

Am hoping the card spurs a little interest and action.

image by John Hain/Pixabay

Thanks for visiting. I always appreciate the folks who press the ‘Like’ button to let me know the post arrived safely.

I am always happy to steer you to letter-writing destinations and resources on the Web. Just let me know what you need.

Goodwill words: Sending hope to a mom facing changes and challenges

This deserving person has experienced a string of bad luck over the years.

A reminder to me: It’s always nice to see that, by sending in a request to More Love Letters, someone is leading the charge to help these letters’ recipients.

Another lesson: There is always a quote available to kickstart any note or letter I’m writing. Yet another: I have fun trying to lighten things up a bit. One of my daily calendars usually comes through…


A few other notes from recent months…1. 2. 3.

Thanks for visiting. I always appreciate the folks who press the ‘Like’ button to let me know the post arrived in legible and at least semi-comprehensible condition.

And a reminder…these notes are just to serve as a nudge forward for those inclined to do something similar to the Goodwill Words Project.

I am always happy to steer you to letter-writing destinations and resources on the Web. Just let me know what you need.

Goodwill words: Another note for *Love for Our Elders*


It’s sometimes a challenge to come up with something different and/or tailored to an unnamed recipient. Love for Our Elders handles the distribution.

So I try to use different sparks or starting points for my messages. Daily calendar pages such as this one are a big help.


And a little plug for Love for Our Elders.
Tagline: We’re fighting loneliness with love, one letter at a time.

Am hoping the card spurs a little interest and action.

Image by Clark Tibbs–Unsplash

Thanks for visiting. I always appreciate the folks who press the ‘Like’ button to let me know the post arrived safely.

I am always happy to steer you to letter-writing destinations and resources on the Web. Just let me know what you need.

Goodwill words: Checking in with a long-time friend

Buddy’s tech skills have come under some household scrutiny of late…
Yes, it’s a mess. The curse of being a lefty doesn’t help.
And forgetting that fact doesn’t help either.

A reminder from this latest foray: Aaaah, the power of imperfectionism. On clear display here. “It’s the thought that counts” could never be more applicable.

But this friend had recently lost her partner of 50+ years and I wanted to follow up our phone visit with something in the mail. Plus, she–an SPCA volunteer and greyhound rescuer–loves dogs. Not sure what she thinks of left-handers, however…

Another reminder: Dog images just plain work for me. And our pets have to earn their keep somehow, right?

Yet another reminder…4 x 6 photos double as postcards quite nicely. [though I’m generally too lazy to dig for a postcard stamp, so I end up slapping on a first-class and get it sent!]


Am hoping the card spurs a little interest and action.


Thanks for visiting. I always appreciate the folks who press the ‘Like’ button to let me know the post arrived safely.

I am always happy to steer you to letter-writing destinations and resources on the Web. Just let me know what you need.

Goodwill words: A little boost for a very responsible 20-year-old


Lesson from this latest letter: There are plenty of folks out there needing support who may not show any signs of struggling.

Another lesson: Red paper and blue ink…not a great contrast for reading off a screen.


Note: Explanation for the amateurish patches of approximated color…

I try to omit the recipient’s name in these posts, even though the More Love Letters website includes them in the Letter Requests section.

Hoping the words count for something.


Thanks for visiting. I always appreciate the folks who press the ‘Like’ button to let me know the post arrived safely.

I am always happy to steer you to letter-writing destinations and resources on the Web. Just let me know what you need.

Goodwill words: Sending hope to a college grad


Note: Explanation for the amateurish patches of approximated color…

I try to omit the recipient’s name in these posts, even though the More Love Letters website includes them in the Letter Requests section.

Hoping the words count for something.


Thanks for visiting. I always appreciate the folks who press the ‘Like’ button to let me know the post arrived safely.

I am always happy to steer you to letter-writing destinations and resources on the Web. Just let me know what you need.

Goodwill words for a couple with faith and fortitude

This recipient and her husband are recovering from a serious auto accident and boy do I feel like a heel when I’m yammering away about some minor inconvenience.


Note: Explanation for the amateurish patches of approximated color…

I try to omit the recipient’s name in these posts, even though the More Love Letters website includes them in the Letter Requests section.

Hoping the words count for something.


Thanks for visiting. I always appreciate the folks who press the ‘Like’ button to let me know the post arrived safely.

I am always happy to steer you to letter-writing destinations and resources on the Web. Just let me know what you need.

Stuck for writing topics? Visit Quora.

Image by Dean Moriarty from Pixabay 

Okay, so here I sit and there is a dog on the floor beside me who is morally (possibly even biologically) opposed to humans using technology when he’s nearby. In other words, he’s smarter than most humans, including me.

Despite the canine objections…seeing as how I’m well into retirement, I was struck with this thought: At what age does a man become a codger?

So I clicked over to Quora. Lots of ideas and discussion [and ads, but I’m sure you’re as adept as I am at looking past that stuff.]

Then, in the right column ‘Are you a geezer, codger, or coot? caught my eye.

Seemed like a fun little etymology exercise.

And it set off my idea machine [ten ideas ideally on a single topic] exercise for the day:

Find ten writing topics from this page on Quora.

1. When did I become a codger?

2. Does my dog think I’m a codger? [An interview]

And I came across, this guy on Quora, who fed me all kinds of topics—

He says he still believes in ‘silly little things like:

3, “Life is simply a never ending series of decisions.”

4. “We are in control of our destiny, although politicians think they are.”

And my favorite…

5. “Worry is the most egregious mistreatment of imagination that there is.”

This person is also shooting to live to 112 1/2—a source of multiple topics…

6. “What if I knew I’d live that long? How would I live my life right now?”

7. “Do I want to live that long?”

8. “If I knew the exact date, or even month, of my passing, how would I treat those last few months?”

And circling back to the original ‘When did I become a codger?’…

9. Would there be a new classification/label for someone who’s hanging around at 112? 

10. Where would I be warehoused at that age?

11. Would I still have a dog at that age?

12. When should we decide to NOT have a dog? [i.e. don’t want to leave him ownerless/homeless if I should pass—or— don’t want to be so feeble that I can’t take good care of him]

So these are thoughts that might have entered my mind as I celebrated World Baking Day yesterday. Instead, I focused on chocolate chip-peanut butter-cranberry cookies and a fresh loaf of Italian cheese bear bread.

Other stuff I’m doing:

retiredguys.net

and more Goodwill Words Project letters.