Curation Corner: Time for some advice…or not.

Image by Michael Arwin Urban from Pixabay

So, let me give you a little advice… ;-|

5 Pieces of Common Writing Advice You Should Absolutely Ignore

A few comments:

Some folks have written complete books on item #1.

Sometimes that longer word just does the work much more effectively.

We’ve all heard about that ‘filthy first draft’ [I prefer the alliterative version.]. But knowing there is a massive clean-up operation ahead often steers me anywhere but there.

The best piece of advice came at the end: “use the wisdom that works for you and discard the rest.”

Keep putting words on the page! Unless, of course, it’s one of your off-days. Or you don’t feel like ‘showing, not telling’. Or you prefer to simply ‘not edit” period/ever/I’ll smack anyone who suggests it!’ vs. ‘edit-as-you-go to’!

There now, wasn’t that helpful?

Curation Corner: 30 uses for those half-used or blank notebooks

Lots of good ideas in Shelby Abrahamsen’s

30 FUN AND EFFECTIVE WAYS
TO USE A BLANK NOTEBOOK

You’ll see some of my favorites in the intro graphic.

Plus, there is something non-threatening to picking up a half-used notebook and diving in with your latest brainstorm. Just my observation…

Curation Corner: Twitter Resources for Writers

I sifted through this piece from hootsuite and I’m highlighting a few from its list.

https://twitter.com/WritersDigest


https://twitter.com/writing_tips

The writer, Todd Clarke, caps the list with the following hashtags readers/writers can follow.

Hope you find some value here!

Lift that pen and go!

Curation Corner: You Can’t Write What You Wouldn’t Read

Target with the words discipline desire drive

The latest from Jon Winokur’s Advice to Writers blog. Also, excerpted in The Complete Handbook of Novel Writing

The most important thing is you can’t write what you wouldn’t read for pleasure. It’s a mistake to analyze the market thinking you can write whatever is hot. You can’t say you’re going to write romance when you don’t even like it. You need to write what you would read if you expect anybody else to read it. And you have to be driven. You have to have the three D’s: drive, discipline and desire. If you’re missing any one of those three, you can have all the talent in the world, but it’s going to be really hard to get anything done. —           Nora Roberts

If you’re writing memoir…free course

I’m currently taking the non-fiction course offered by scribewriting.com. With a number of resources and ample instructor expertise, the logical and methodical approach been very helpful in addressing audience and outlining the larger project. [Tomorrow, we will cover more of the actual writing of the book and on Friday, they are offering a Q. and A. session that will last at least an hour.]

These same folks will be teaching a free course on memoir next week.

Follow this link to sign up: https://scribewriting.com/bookschool/

Just thought I would pass along the info for those considering a new non-fiction project.

Curation Corner: Writerly Wisdom


Henry Miller’s 11 Commandments of Writing

Thanks to Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings for this excellent page that includes Miller’s ‘daily program’.

My favorites: 

  1. Work on one thing at a time until finished.
  2. Don’t be nervous. Work calmly, joyously, recklessly on whatever is in hand.
  3. Forget the books you want to write. Think only of the book you are writing.

This 21 Authors Share One Piece of Advice for Writers post by Robert Lee Brewer from Writer’s Digest could easily be a springboard for 21 separate posts. The word cloud above offers a few items from the article. Take a look.

An Austin Kleon writing strategy: Keep dumb thoughts.

Austin Kleon encourages us to be attentive and diligent in writing down all our thoughts and sift through them for later exploration.

How about ratcheting up your powers of attentiveness?

Here are a few ideas from Cris Freese in this Writer’s Digest article.

Reminder: Simply restricting one or more of the five senses will heighten the others. [Try closing your eyes while eating. You will most likely hear your chewing more distinctly and I’ve found more flavors are pronounced. But hey, maybe that’s just me. But really, try it.]

Curation Monday–Links for Writers

Back to ‘curation’ mode…

pinterest icon

I’m not an avid user of Pinterest, but when I do sit down with it, well, it really is a gold mine of links and information.

Here are a few Pinterest-gleaned items that might interest you:

1. A Writer’s Manifesto
http://thewritewire.tumblr.com/post/96286625297

2. 101 Best Websites for Writers [I clicked the link which sent me to a page that offered a link to this valuable PDF.]
http://www.writersdigest.com/thank-you-for-subscribing-to-the-writers-digest-newsletter

3. 10 Great Podcasts for Writers
https://www.aerogrammestudio.com/2013/05/20/10-great-podcasts-for-writers/

4. The Super-Secret Way to Create Suspense in Your Story
https://www.helpingwritersbecomeauthors.com/suspense-in-your-story/

 

Writers Horoscope December 8: Today, you can’t make up your mind.

Who can blame you?

angel-devil clip art

Some folks post content about setting goals, about finishing, establishing habits.

And those same shmucks then post suggestions to break habits, to mix things up. And they glorify those times when they procrastinate on their writing.

Who are these people and why are they allowed to publish this drivel? It has to stop!

Maybe tomorrow.

In the meantime, just to add to the confusion, take a look at what Susie Orman Schnall says in Writer’s Digest about balancing work and life. Pay particular attention to tip #4.