Writers Horoscope December 16: You revive your notebook habit.

 

From 201 Ways to Arouse Your Creativity,
one of Joel at Lifehack’s ‘rejuvenating tips’:
Carry a notebook everywhere.

 

notes1notes2

Hey, they’re just notes. But my observation of the uncooperative nature of computers nudged me toward drawing a parallel with some people. Possible subject for a short essay or blog post.

I also like the story possibilities of YouTube alerting a teacher to a student straying a bit from the assigned work.

Writers Horoscope December 15: You revisit an oft-forgotten strategy.

It’s certainly easy to jot down these ideas in a notebook, but sometimes the alternative tool forces one to rethink key points and make different connections. I also think the digital nature can afford writers/creatives a few options to branch their work toward other projects/products.

In revisiting Seth Godin’s Rules for Working in a Studio, I would say I adhered to the following:

  1. Don’t hide your work.
  2. Upgrade your tools.
  3. Change something.
  4. Obsess about appropriate quality; ignore perfection.

Writers Horoscope December 13: You sift through a sea of advice.

From yesterday’s Rules for Working in a Studio, you decide to narrow the list, with some variations tailored for your growth.

For example…

‘Make big promises.’ becomes ‘Make big promises…to yourself.’ ‘Keep them.’ logically follows.

And you merge ‘Don’t hide your work.’ with ‘Don’t hide your mistakes’ and ‘You are not your work. Embrace criticism.’ [Challenging, for sure.]

 

 

Writers Horoscope December 4: Today, you redefine ‘practice’.

With help from Seth Godin.

One kind of practice fits the traditional definition. We repeat processes until we improve. Shooting baskets, playing ‘Greensleeves’, making the perfect sunnyside-up egg.

arrow-target-practice

Says Godin:

“The other kind of practice is more valuable but far more rare.”

be change become practice

“This is the practice of failure. Of trying on one point of view after another until you find one that works. Of creating original work that doesn’t succeed until it does. Of writing, oration and higher-level math in search of an elusive outcome, even a truth, one that might not even be there…We become original through practice.”

Here’s hoping you’re making time for both types of practice.