Curation Corner: Don’t Delete!

I appreciated Mary Gaitskill’s wisdom in this item I gleaned from advicetowriters.com

Here’s an excerpt from the excerpt:

When you’re writing on the computer, you don’t cross it out, you just delete it. But now, if I’m not sure, I don’t delete it. Instead of making the revision, I just put it in a bracket and write my second idea, and I can look back and see which I think was better, because sometimes the first thing is actually better.

Writing advice from Lydia Davis

lydia davis writing tips word cloud
These are my main takeaways from her extensive list.

Adapted from the essay “Thirty Recommendations for Good Writing Habits” in Essays One by Lydia Davis…

Thank you to lithub.com for this list… 


Have a great weekend, readers. Me? Along with digital projects, I’ll be procrastinating in the kitchen…caramel-pecan-cranberry-apple pie is on the menu, as well as my first attempt at a kringle.

 

 

Writers, raise your voice!

You can't find your voice if you don't use it.

A few valuable posts on author’s voice…

Reclaiming My Writer’s Voice
by Kay Bolden

My favorite lines from the post:

The keyboard and the screen made it far too easy to distance myself from my words. To sink into sales mode or trope mode or campaign mode. When I write by hand, I lead with my body, not my brain.

How I Found My Writing Voice and How You Can Find Yours:
A Metaphor Involving Sandwiches
by Carly Mae

Some favorite lines from this post:

Our writing is not genuine, we don’t feel like ourselves, or it’s stilted and mechanical — feeling more like a “I have to write” versus “I want to write.”

If you feel that way, you might be lacking your voice.

***

The biggest reason your writing feels mechanical and stilted is because it is. It’s not you. So when you read it, it probably sounds fake.

Your audience reads it that way it too.

View at Medium.com

Curation Wednesday: Risk-taking and Writing

risk-1945683_640

http://ingridsundberg.com/2010/04/02/write-with-reckless-abandon/

Back in 2010, Ingrid Sundberg attended a writing conference and posted her notes from a session Four Rules on Risk Taking and Writing by author Libba Bray.

Some of the highlights:

  1. Explore what we don’t know! We write to open up a whole new conversation with ourselves and the world.
  2. Sit at the kitchen table with your characters. See what they would say.
  3. Beware the thought “Should I….” Follow yourself and not what you think others may want you to be doing.
  4. There is no sure thing other than writing the thing you want to write the most.
  5. If it is not scary then there are no stakes. And if there are no stakes then it is not worth writing.

Thanks to Ingrid Sundberg for sharing this.

 

 

 

 

 

Twitter Gems May 13

Here’s a nice tweet I just ran across from 
 
Life is short, live it. Love is rare, grab it. Anger is bad, dump it. Fear is awful, face it. Memories are sweet, cherish it.
 
We writers can apply all these emotions to our work.
Even if all we’re doing is establishing some warmup momentum, these can definitely pay off.
**
from Jordan Rosenfeld  @Jordanrosenfeld
Your writing projects are like children that don’t always get along. Attend to them separately. #fightoverwhelm #AWritersGuide2Persistence
Good advice, but not always applicable in my case. There are times when it occurs to me that some of my project need to be, if not merged, at least juggled simultaneously. [Juggling, of course, implies that sometimes creative gravity takes over and objects are dropped. But hey! At least I got them up in the air.]
**
Inspiration exists, but it has to find us working. –PABLO PICASSO
Geez, I hate it when a well-targeted Tweet or nugget of advice arrives at the very moment I’m lip-diddling or ‘organizing’ my iTunes collections or god-knows-what. This is one of those Tweets.

Curation Thursday: Julia Cameron’s The Right to Write

More excerpts from Julia Cameron’s The Right to Write

In her chapter on specificity…

“For me, part of the ability to be specific has to do with writing to a specific someone, someone who ‘gets you’. I know that writers are often told not to think about their audience, but I think that advice can be difficult to use. The audience then becomes something vague and amorphous. How do you communicate with that?”

“Choose someone on whom nothing will be wasted, someone with an appetite for life in all its messy glory. That someone will enjoy your writing specifically. Write specifically to that someone.”  [This is helping me with a current middle-grade fiction project. TH]

“It is a great paradox that the more personal, focused, and specific your writing becomes, the more universally it communicates.”

Curation Saturday–Tweets About Writing

A few favorites from Jon Winokur’s recent Tweets…

@AdviceToWriters

Find your best time of the day for writing and write. Don’t let anything else interfere. Afterwards it won’t matter to you that the kitchen is a mess.
ESTHER FREUD #amwriting #writing #writinglife

**

Write what you want. People rarely recognize themselves on the page. And if they do, they’re often flattered that a writer has paid attention.
FRANCINE PROSE

**

“Most people have no concept of writing, or what’s involved with the process…”
David Sedaris