Curation Corner: Look into MasterClass Live

As I’m writing this, Dan (The DaVinci Code) Brown is the middle of his 50-minute YouTube video that includes a Q and A session with students who had signed up for his MasterClass course.

Here is the link to MasterClass Live on YouTube. Lots of excellent free knowledge being shared by the experts.

I was going to post this next week, but I’m going to squeeze this in today to promote their 2-for-1 annual membership offer through Nov. 30. (Nope, not getting any $$ for doing this. Just wanted to pass this along. I’m inches away from ordering myself, as it opens me up to send a free year as a Christmas gift.)

Derek Sivers: 6 links re: a very interesting guy

Derek Sivers offers mountains of value at no cost to you.

Check out his notes on books he’s read.

More specifically, writers, here are his notes on the classic, On Writing Well.

And this blog post: $250K books sold. $250K to save lives.

Here are Goodreads comments on his book, Hell Yeah or No: What’s Worth Doing. I don’t see the book listed on Amazon, despite the Amazon link on the Goodreads page. It didn’t turn up in Apple Books either, so I think he’s simply selling it on his site. Sounds good to me.

Even better than the comments, here is his overview of the book. (Feels more like the entire book. Hey, I’m not complaining.)

Telepathic writing…whoa!

Today I’m sharing an insightful 2014 piece by Jon Brooks entitled Quentin Tarantino’s Telepathic Writing Technique.

It is packed with concepts and ideas that I hadn’t before run across.

Brooks introduced me to ‘mirror neurons’, which “fire both when an animal acts and when the animal observes the same action performed by another.” [Wikipedia]

Okay, where does Quentin Tarantino come in?
From Tarantino’s 2013 Oscar acceptance speech: “You guys [friends] don’t realize how important you are to my process. I don’t want input; I don’t want you to tell me if I’m doing anything wrong. Heavens forbid. But, I write a scene and I think I’ve heard it as much as I can, but then when I read it to you – I don’t give it to you to read, I read it – but when I read it to you, I hear it through your ears. And it lets me know I’m on the right track.”

As he reads, then, Tarantino’s mirror neurons fire and he picks up the listeners’ reactions to his work.

What does that mean for the rest of us who are not quite chalking up multiple Oscars?

Take that one extra step beyond reading your work aloud–find an audience who follows the rule of: No feedback, please! Brooks justifies this rule with his observation that people often don’t effectively express their impressions and misguided feedback may well lead you to the toss the whole project.

Brooks closes with this: “You want to know what you think about your work as a first-time reader, not someone else.”

Considering our current pandemic conditions, you may be relegated to telepathic writing over the phone. Hey, it’s called playing the cards we’re dealt, right?

I also tried recording a piece of my writing aloud–and then listening to that recording. I’m not sure if that recreated the mirror-neurons experience, but I will try it again. It does add some distance between yourself and your work.

So, give it a try.

Let me know how telepathic writing worked for you.

Curation Corner: toasted-cheese.com

Photo by Patrick Tomasso on Unsplash

Picked up on this interesting site via my weekly Internet Scout Report.

This link takes you to its calendar of writing topics/prompts, but check out the other menu items as well, including the Writer’s Excuse Bingo, which strikes me as potential Zoom meeting fodder for your writers group.

[Note: Ignore the ‘Resources’ menu item. Lots of dead ends there.]

Enjoy!

Curation Corner: Check out WritingRoutines.com

Whoa…the 100 Interviews page alone abounds with lessons and insights from successful writers, researchers, and award-winners.

Some favorite topics covered:

  1. The trap of calling yourself a ‘writer’ [Neil Pasricha]
  2. Drawing to Spark Writiing [Dana Simpson]
  3. Carving out distraction-free creative blocks [Dr. Michael Greger]
  4. Declaring a ‘shut-down’ time [KJ Dell’Antonia]
  5. How to be indistractable [Nir Eyal]

Just think of the self-customized online course you could create this site.

And if you’re in a writers group, this is tailor-made or a fun and informative Zoom meeting.

Curation Corner: You Can’t Write What You Wouldn’t Read

Target with the words discipline desire drive

The latest from Jon Winokur’s Advice to Writers blog. Also, excerpted in The Complete Handbook of Novel Writing

The most important thing is you can’t write what you wouldn’t read for pleasure. It’s a mistake to analyze the market thinking you can write whatever is hot. You can’t say you’re going to write romance when you don’t even like it. You need to write what you would read if you expect anybody else to read it. And you have to be driven. You have to have the three D’s: drive, discipline and desire. If you’re missing any one of those three, you can have all the talent in the world, but it’s going to be really hard to get anything done. —           Nora Roberts

If you’re writing memoir…free course

I’m currently taking the non-fiction course offered by scribewriting.com. With a number of resources and ample instructor expertise, the logical and methodical approach been very helpful in addressing audience and outlining the larger project. [Tomorrow, we will cover more of the actual writing of the book and on Friday, they are offering a Q. and A. session that will last at least an hour.]

These same folks will be teaching a free course on memoir next week.

Follow this link to sign up: https://scribewriting.com/bookschool/

Just thought I would pass along the info for those considering a new non-fiction project.

Curation Corner: Writerly Wisdom


Henry Miller’s 11 Commandments of Writing

Thanks to Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings for this excellent page that includes Miller’s ‘daily program’.

My favorites: 

  1. Work on one thing at a time until finished.
  2. Don’t be nervous. Work calmly, joyously, recklessly on whatever is in hand.
  3. Forget the books you want to write. Think only of the book you are writing.

This 21 Authors Share One Piece of Advice for Writers post by Robert Lee Brewer from Writer’s Digest could easily be a springboard for 21 separate posts. The word cloud above offers a few items from the article. Take a look.