Overwhelmed at the thought of writing?

Fast Company’s Art Markman has four suggestions:

  1. Break it down

  2. Make an outline

  3. Just get something down

  4. Write for five more minutes


If the list doesn’t tell you enough [and it doesn’t], here is the fleshed out version.

And I would add another suggestion.

Bake…[no, it doesn’t necessarily help you generate a bestseller, but it’s great for an afternoon coffee and who knows, the caramel experiment might just pay off in a fun blog post.]

two banana breads side-by-side
I added an amaretto caramel to the banana bread on the left. I added an Irish cream caramel to the banana bread on the right.

Writing prompt: “it was…weird.”

'it was...weird' silkscreen on shirt
When he walked into the room, his shirt was pure black. When he walked out 30 seconds later…

Write 100 words [or more] on what you the observer viewed as the person exited the building and any hints as to what went on inside the mysterious room.

Have fun with it.

  • Did it happen in the White House? A doctor’s office? A room at the IRS?

  • Who are ‘you’? Who is the ‘he’?

Three More Ways to Spur Your Creativity

dog wearing glasses; dog sitting in front of a laptop
Image by Karen Arnold from Pixabay

More from

201 Ways to Arouse Your Creativity

— Keep a box labeled for each project. Toss everything in the box, and don’t worry about misplacing things or ideas.

from Amy Ng of Pikaland

— Choose just one creative aim for the day. What one creative project can you begin/continue/finish today?

from Dan Goodwin’s Wakeful Ways at A Big Creative Yes

— Think on paper. With a bunch of loose paper, start jotting ideas down. Here are four benefits of writing by hand.

from Jacob Cass at Just Creative Design

201 Ways to Spur Your Creativity

person with Person sitting on couch

This guest post by Katie Tallo of Momentum Gathering can be found at https://writetodone.com

201 Ways to Arouse Your Creativity

She compiled these suggestions from a number of sources.

  1. from Alison Motluk: “Seek out creative company. The best ideas are forged not in moments of solitary genius, but during exchanges with trusted colleagues.” [Note: Austin Kleon calls this creative company a ‘scenius‘.]
    Five silhouettes looking outward
  2. from Jacob Cass at Just Creative Designs:  “Mindmap. Whether you use key words, images, colours, a hierarchy system, numbers, outlines, circles or random words, mindmapping gets your creative juices flowing.”

    light bulb surrounded by mind map set against chalkboard

  3. from Steve Pavlina:  “Architect a worthy challenge. If a task is too easy, you don’t need to be particularly creative, so your creative self will simply say, “You can manage this one without me.”

    outline of person with a choice to follow one of three arrows/directions

Seize the moment…

girl-reaching

So it’s like this.

My friend from NY sent me a quick email telling me a classmate of ours from junior high had passed away…a year ago.

M was always a pretty happy-go-lucky guy and he was the same way as we went facemark-to-facemask in a junior college football game in 1972. And the same way as he served customers at his dad’s fish market and at the restaurant he started in the 80’s.

While I hadn’t seen him for decades, his passing hit me a little harder.

Maybe each succeeding loss of a contemporary does that now…but it was yet another reminder, a tug at my insides, with the familiar message…”What in God’s name are you waiting for? Get out there and make stuff!”

Yeah…it doesn’t have to be good—especially at first. It has to be done, so you have something to build on, a reference point.

And let’s all assume we’re not going to live forever, so it’s time to build some creative momentum.

It doesn’t have to be a leap. Even a step will do. But let’s aim together to be in a different place than we were the day before.

How to Never Miss a Day of Creative Work

Highlights:

  1. “Take the minimal viable action of sitting down at your desk…”
  2. “Reduce the scope, but stick to the schedule.”
  3. “It’s better to lower your standards and actually follow through…”

no-yes

Leave It to Beaver…actually, Wally

Feeling the need for simplicity and–sighhhh–a trip down memory lane, I called up an episode of Leave It to Beaver. [You do realize life was perfect back then.]

Beaver tells his family that he wants to be a writer.

Ward Cleaver (to Beaver): I think you should do what Somerset Maugham did.
Beaver: Was he a writer?
Wally: With a name like that what do you think he is? A linebacker for the Baltimore Colts?

Classic line, Wally.


Image credit: ABC Television [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons