Curation Corner: Wealth of Writer’s Digest Freebies

As I cruised the Writer’s Digest website for other resources, I came across this page of free downloads. [Signing up for their newsletter is requested, however.]

Some of the topics:

— Cheat Sheets for NaNoWriMo 

— Plot Development: Charts and Tips for Outlining and Plotting a Novel 1

— 4 Amateur Mistakes Every Writer Should Avoid

Hope these help.

Curation Corner: Considering NANOWRIMO?

Further affirming a recent post‘s message…

Writer’s Digest offers this PDF of 30 writing prompts and six essays of advice and inspiration to help veterans and newbies get the most out of the annual challenge.

Hope it helps.

Curation Corner: Write something.

WRITE SOMETHING

Write.

Improve.

Post.

Repeat process.

Do this enough and you can overcome your fear of writing, which is a most accurate explanation for ‘writer’s block’.

Thank you, Seth Godin. Here is his ‘Top 100’.

More Seth Godin posts about writing and creating…

** Advice for Authors

** You Should Write an Ebook

** Quieting the Lizard Brain

Writers: Embrace failure.

Photo courtesy of Gratisography

When I came across a page online with the same message, I immediately thought about us writers. (I’ve probably even used the image before.)

I explored the topic more deeply here, including a link to Enjoying the Fun of Failure.

Tough writer talk from Margaret Atwood

Larry D. Moore, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

“Writing is work. It’s also gambling. You don’t get a pension plan. Other people can help you a bit, but essentially you’re on your own. Nobody is making you do this: you chose it, so don’t whine.”

I don’t think I’d mess with her. ;->

And geeeez, talk about someone who is not just an accomplished writer, but an accomplished person


Meanwhile, I love what Grammarly says about her wording:

An Austin Kleon writing strategy: Keep dumb thoughts.

Austin Kleon encourages us to be attentive and diligent in writing down all our thoughts and sift through them for later exploration.

How about ratcheting up your powers of attentiveness?

Here are a few ideas from Cris Freese in this Writer’s Digest article.

Reminder: Simply restricting one or more of the five senses will heighten the others. [Try closing your eyes while eating. You will most likely hear your chewing more distinctly and I’ve found more flavors are pronounced. But hey, maybe that’s just me. But really, try it.]

Writers Horoscope December 31: A familiar question wells up…

Maybe you took Austin Kleon’s 30-Day Challenge. And you nailed it.

And then that question: What’s next?

Consider this thought from Ian Svenonius, Supernatural Strategies for Making a Rock ‘n’ Roll Group:

You will never know exactly what you must do, it will never be enough… no matter what change you achieve, you will most likely see no dividend from it. And even after you have achieved greatness, the [tiny number of people] who even noticed will ask, ‘What next?’” **

And so the question: What next?

boy-on inner tube in ocean

This is not to dismiss what you might have accomplished in the last month…or year…or decade. Or to evoke dissatisfaction.

Instead, use the question as a prod to pursue new projects, skills, friends.

Or maybe I’m just nudging myself in that direction.

Either way, have an adventurous–and fulfilling–2018.

 


**got Svenonius quote from a blog post by Austin Kleon

Note: The link for Svenonius’s book is an affiliate link. It doesn’t raise the price on the book, but it will bring me a very small amount of money.

Writers Horoscope December 8: Today, you can’t make up your mind.

Who can blame you?

angel-devil clip art

Some folks post content about setting goals, about finishing, establishing habits.

And those same shmucks then post suggestions to break habits, to mix things up. And they glorify those times when they procrastinate on their writing.

Who are these people and why are they allowed to publish this drivel? It has to stop!

Maybe tomorrow.

In the meantime, just to add to the confusion, take a look at what Susie Orman Schnall says in Writer’s Digest about balancing work and life. Pay particular attention to tip #4.