10 Writing Prompts for October 18

Word Art (7)

  1. “Sure—what the heck—I’ll marry you.”

  2. “You’re not a lawyer, are you?”

  3. “Connect the dots, Einstein.”

  4. “Do you really think she’s guilty?”

  5. “It’s time to take the leap.”

  6. “This dog…is he planning to stay on my lap all night?”

  7. “Why do people always ask me that?”
    “Look at yourself. Can you blame them?”

  8. “Your apartment…could it be in a seedier part of town?”

  9. “Hey, enough with the theatrics. Either make your phone call or haul your butt into the cell.”

  10. “You’re kidding! I get a corporate credit card?”
    “Yes, it’s yours. But don’t go nuts.”
    I didn’t hear a word he said.

***

How to use writing prompts, from WikiHow…

As you near project completion, the voices creep in…

statue of man thinking and worrying

You can’t finish this. Just leave it be. No one’s going to care anyway. You’re not going to be a published author. No one’s going to care.

The above excerpt from a Medium post by Christopher Connors, [Don’t Fear Your Doubts and Insecurities — Let them Drive Your Life] reflects the uncertainty he felt as he was editing the final chapters of his book.

Two additional points from Connors’ post

“Fear and insecurities are given life by the voice inside our heads.”

“Please. Do what you want. Go after what you want with maximum effort and energy.”

Read this valuable piece. If you’ve not experienced these doubts, I sincerely envy you. And if you have, well, welcome to the club!

 

 

Musings of a writer during board game development…

board game
Just think of how many plot twists some of your favorite board games provide.

I attended my first board game creation class last night.

It offers a different way of looking at making something from scratch.

And I realized there is considerable crossover between this process and fiction writing.

I also thought of ways to incorporate game creation into my middle grade novel. I think I’ll have the teacher ask kids to write a story and, as they’re writing it, thinking of ways to turn it into a board game. The teacher will hope that it will amp up her writers’  visualization skills and add interesting plot twists and memorable characters with engaging personalities.

I then decided I should try this same approach for my own fiction projects.

This wouldn’t always apply, of course, but for some stories, I might ask myself the following questions:

  1. How would my current story play out in game format?

  2. Are my characters doing enough to earn a role in this game? [i.e. or are they so boring that I wouldn’t want to include them?]

  3. Would my game/story not only provide characters with clear goals, but enough obstacles to make people want to keep playing/reading?

Okay, thanks for reading. I’m always interested to hear if some of these ideas resonate with you.

Ready! Pen in hand? Go!

10 Writing Prompts for October 4

Word Art

  1. “Trust me. This will help you grow and become a better person.”

  2. We hated to admit it. She was right and we were, well, deep in left field…

  3. And with those words, he had entered the hallowed halls of dinkdom…

  4. I just wanted a nice party for Jamie, and then this…

  5. The coach smirked, then looked on admiringly.  “He’s small, but he’s slow.”

  6. This was more than a school prank.

  7. “Come on now, Love Buckets, hand it over.”

  8. “Are you doing all this just to hurt me?”

  9. Let’s just say his romantic plan completely unraveled.

  10. “There is no world where I can sit by and watch this happen to my kids.”

***

How to use writing prompts, from WikiHow…

11 Writing Prompts for Sept. 30…and how to use them.

Warmups Cloud

  1. “Leave? To go where?”

  2. “Are you serious? You talked yesterday about staying here for good. And now this?”

  3. “I feel so stupid. I should have known this would happen.”

  4. “Why are we in the same spot we were in ten years ago?”

  5. “Let’s just agree. This guy is far from a perfect ten.”

  6. “You’re definitely a royal something.”

  7. “You and I both know you’re the reason we imploded.”

  8. “No, I am not a stalker. And yes, we do keep running into each other.”

  9. “Out with it! What’s your question?”

  10. It was time to put an end to this little rebellion.

  11. That dog’s eyes said one thing: “I am going to love you into oblivion.”

***

How to use writing prompts, from WikiHow…

INSPIRED BY TODAY’S JUMBLE®

jumbled letters gratisography-419-thumbnail

What took me so long?

A blog named Word Inventions and I never got around to making up my own words?

Well, the time has come…

Thank you to David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek, creators of JUMBLE®–‘That scrambled word game’…

CLYDOC

Marcie turned from the cloudy weather outside and shook her head at the new workmate, deep into his daily chants. What a complete and utter yuclod.

NEIGSN

“Ensign! You’re not facing your men until you get that festering sennig removed from your chin!”

REBGLI

The Senator glared at his staff. “Time to change the narrative. Send for Bob. He’s the best bilger our super pac can buy.”

***Image courtesy of gratisography.com

10 Writing Prompts for September 24

Word Art (7)

  1. “Give it up. It’s old technology.”
    Just I wanted to hear. I’d show these dorks…
  2. “She tops out at one hundred words a minute.”
  3. “Granted, it’s not the easiest car to extricate yourself from.”
  4. “How about a coffee?”
    He reached into his briefcase. “Only if it comes with a little extra something.”
  5. “I will if you want me to.”
  6. “Your whole world is a sitcom!”
  7. There was something special about their devil-may-care approach…
  8. “Let’s just say it’s not exactly Shakespeare.”
    “Well, duuuhhh.”
  9. “Yeah, that kind of thing can happen with fourth-graders.”
  10. This was our kind of traffic jam. We all jumped out and…

***

#7