Saturday Twitter Gems

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Here’s a funny one:

Jon Winokur 
How do you know if your child is a writer? Your obstetrician holds his stethoscope to your abdomen and only hears excuses.
FRAN LEBOWITZ
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A scene feels purposeful when you give the character that stars in it an intention, or a goal to pursue. #makeAscene

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Hemingway’s advice on writing: In any art you’re allowed to steal anything if you can make it better.”

 

Twitter Gems May 13

Here’s a nice tweet I just ran across from 
 
Life is short, live it. Love is rare, grab it. Anger is bad, dump it. Fear is awful, face it. Memories are sweet, cherish it.
 
We writers can apply all these emotions to our work.
Even if all we’re doing is establishing some warmup momentum, these can definitely pay off.
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from Jordan Rosenfeld  @Jordanrosenfeld
Your writing projects are like children that don’t always get along. Attend to them separately. #fightoverwhelm #AWritersGuide2Persistence
Good advice, but not always applicable in my case. There are times when it occurs to me that some of my project need to be, if not merged, at least juggled simultaneously. [Juggling, of course, implies that sometimes creative gravity takes over and objects are dropped. But hey! At least I got them up in the air.]
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Inspiration exists, but it has to find us working. –PABLO PICASSO
Geez, I hate it when a well-targeted Tweet or nugget of advice arrives at the very moment I’m lip-diddling or ‘organizing’ my iTunes collections or god-knows-what. This is one of those Tweets.

Curation Thursday: Julia Cameron’s The Right to Write

More excerpts from Julia Cameron’s The Right to Write

In her chapter on specificity…

“For me, part of the ability to be specific has to do with writing to a specific someone, someone who ‘gets you’. I know that writers are often told not to think about their audience, but I think that advice can be difficult to use. The audience then becomes something vague and amorphous. How do you communicate with that?”

“Choose someone on whom nothing will be wasted, someone with an appetite for life in all its messy glory. That someone will enjoy your writing specifically. Write specifically to that someone.”  [This is helping me with a current middle-grade fiction project. TH]

“It is a great paradox that the more personal, focused, and specific your writing becomes, the more universally it communicates.”

Curation Sunday: Julia Cameron’s The Right to Write

Today, I’m sharing excerpts from Julia Cameron’s varied works. She is the author of 40 fiction and non-fiction books, including The Artist’s Way and Finding Water. Look for curated content from her other works in the future.

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Here are three gems from The Right to Write

“When we ‘forget ourselves’, it is easy to write. We are not standing there, stiff as a soldier, our entire ego shimmied into every capital ‘I’. When we forget ourselves, when we let go of being good, and settle into just being a writer…When we are just the vehicle, the storyteller and not the point of the story, we often write very well—we certainly write more easily.”

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“The trick to finding writing time, then, is to write from love and not with an eye to product…The lies we tell ourselves about writing and time are all connected to envy, to the fairy tale notion that there are others whose lives are simpler, better funded, more conducive to writing than our own.”

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“Early in my writing life, I tried to polish as I went…Writing this way was frustrating, difficult, and disheartening, like trying to write a movie and cut it at the same time.”

“The danger of writing and rewriting at the same time was that it was tied in to my mood. In an expansive mood, whatever I wrote was great. In a constricted mood, nothing was good.”   [Note: I’m pretty sure you can figure out her solution.]

“…get whatever is in you out.”

creative tools collage

Todd Henry began ‘speaking to me’ way back in 2015 when part of my job was to create something ‘new’ or ‘more original’ than what was already out there.

This author/creator of four books [Die Empty, The Accidental Creative, and Louder Than Words, and Herding Tigers–I have the first three.] has been a go-to ‘mentor’ ever since.   >>NON-affiliate link to his books

Let’s ‘listen in’ to this excerpt from his newsletter that arrived yesterday [3/30/2018]:

“You have one job: get whatever is in you out. Your one and only job today, and every day, is to get whatever is in you out. Not tomorrow’s work, not yesterday’s work, but today’s. On my computer monitor is a note that reads, “Can I lay my head down tonight satisfied with the work I did today?” If I have made my contribution that day, I can rest with a clean conscience.

Do not be dulled, friends. Do not allow the lull of comfort to cause you to abdicate your contribution. Stay sharp. Keep your edges. Nothing – NOTHING – is worth giving up the most precious thing you have to offer.”

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Pep talk

Hey, there is not this vast expanse of creative time and energy in front of us.
We have to get to it.
Now.
Find your creative tools of choice.
Start with five minutes.
Then maybe ten minutes.
And let’s see where it takes us.

 

NOTE: I ‘borrowed’ this post from my other blog, retirerenew.com .

Curation Friday: Austin Kleon gems…

inbox internet overload

I confess to allowing my inboxes to be overloaded with quality resources that I don’t consistently pursue. Not so with Austin Kleon’s weekly newsletters…

Here are two Austin Kleon items that I vouch for:

1. Working On It [5 Quick Thoughts on Writing]

2. How to Keep Going [Take time to watch his 26-minute talk OR, if you’re pressed for time, lock in his list of ten tips and bookmark the page for a later viewing.

Two of my favorites:
The ordinary + extra attention = extraordinary.
Build a ‘bliss station’. [borrowed from Joseph Campbell]
Quote from Austin: “Airplane mode is not just a setting on your phone; it can be a way of life.”

Another of his tips: You are allowed to change your mind. Well, here goes…I was going to add a third A. Kleon gem, but other commitments arose and I just plain wanted this out in the world, so I’m changing my mind and sharing only two. Thanks, Austin, for the license to do so!

And believe me, these two items are value-packed. So, turn on Airplane Mode and enjoy.

Curation Monday: If You Can Talk, You Can Write [more gems]

More worthwhile points from If You Can Talk, You Can Write by Joel Saltzman. [Not an affiliate link. I just couldn’t easily find his own website.]

  • ” ‘Who needs another book on writing?’ ”
    I did.
    I needed to write this book for myself–to see if I could take what I had learned over the years and write about it my way, with my particular slant on things.”
  • “Remember: There’s nothing new under the sun. So don’t let an old idea stand in your way, not for a second. Don’t sit around waiting for the Big Idea; start with a small idea (like “two women go on a road trip”) and make it big.”
  • A quote from John Cougar Mellencamp: “All I can really do is entertain myself, and hope along the way I can entertain somebody else.”