Let your mind wander

I’ve been reading The Wander Society by Keri Smith. And it got me to thinking about the wandering mind.

Here’s an interesting post on one writer’s research into and use of that valuable resource.

Why Writers Should Let Their Minds Wander

Which led to this fun foray of my own.

I noticed recently that Vanderbilt University extended the contract for their bowling coach.

A few thoughts, and many more questions than answers.

What does pre-season training look like? Powering down six-packs and then rolling a game or two? Practicing high-fives and, after the training table beer consumption, hoping to make hand-to-hand high-five contact?

Where do they travel? And what do they travel in?

Are there rankings?

Is there a TV contract?

What league are they in?

What does a coach’s recruiting trip look like? How do they win over a bowling prospect’s parents? What side benefits are they offered?

Has any school been put on probation for recruiting violations? Or for lack of institutional control?

Does the NCAA oversee bowling programs?

Is there a ‘one-and-done’ rule as in basketball?

Are there pre-match bonfires? Pep rallies? Do cheerleaders show up at competition and do they have to wear bowling shoes when doing their routines?

What does halftime entertainment look like? Where do you fit an entire college band?

Do they have to work their schedule around the Alley Cats, Nimble Seniors, and Mixed Minglers Leagues?

Are there playoffs? Sponsored bowl games? [Ironic label, eh?] No doubt, Brunswick would be one of the companies ponying up some cash.

What does a coach’s contract look like? Is it incentive-laden and if so, what are the incentives?

Uniforms? What do they look like? Are Nike, Adidas, Under Armour clamoring for bowling shoe sponsorship?

What about team trainers? What are the most prevalent injuries?

Are referees needed? What would unsportsmanlike conduct look like? What would targeting look like in a bowling match? Illegal motion? And are they called ‘matches’? Duels? Alley-fights?

Have Las Vegas oddsmakers gotten involved?

How can you ‘throw a game’ without attracting suspicion?

Is there such a thing as ‘home lane advantage’?

Yes, pretty pathetic that I’ve expended that much energy on this, but…when dealing with reality is the alternative, suddenly obsessing over college bowling starts to make sense.

Writers, raise your voice!

You can't find your voice if you don't use it.

A few valuable posts on author’s voice…

Reclaiming My Writer’s Voice
by Kay Bolden

My favorite lines from the post:

The keyboard and the screen made it far too easy to distance myself from my words. To sink into sales mode or trope mode or campaign mode. When I write by hand, I lead with my body, not my brain.

How I Found My Writing Voice and How You Can Find Yours:
A Metaphor Involving Sandwiches
by Carly Mae

Some favorite lines from this post:

Our writing is not genuine, we don’t feel like ourselves, or it’s stilted and mechanical — feeling more like a “I have to write” versus “I want to write.”

If you feel that way, you might be lacking your voice.

***

The biggest reason your writing feels mechanical and stilted is because it is. It’s not you. So when you read it, it probably sounds fake.

Your audience reads it that way it too.

View story at Medium.com

Ten Writing Prompts for February 12

writing prompts word cloud

  1. This was the moment I had waited for…I marched into his office.

  2. “Yes, I know what you mean. I threw a fit yesterday about the same thing…”

  3. “Hello? This is Vegas Vacations. Have you heard about our latest deal?”

  4. “Whatever you do, don’t take a side.”

  5. “Chain your attack dogs, please.”

  6. This was the last lecture I’d ever have to hear from her…

  7. “Shepherd’s pie? It looked more like third base from last night’s game.”

  8. I had to admit it. I needed a friend.

  9. “Here he comes. Get out the butterfly net.”

  10. Breaking up on Valentines Day? What was I thinking? More important, what was she thinking?

  11. I tried to hurry past the deli. It was no use…

Ten Writing Prompts for January 17

writing prompts wordart

  1. “No, no! Not in the car!”

  2. All we needed was a hundred pounds of ice…

  3. “I have to tell you something, but you have to keep some perspective.”

  4. “The cell phone could only be in-oh-fifty places…”

  5. “What am I supposed to believe?”
    “Based on your past history, whatever you’re in the mood to believe.”

  6. “I don’t want to hear it. Besides, I’ve heard it all.”
    “Okaaayyyy, so if I told you that she wants to marry you…”

  7. It was a tough decision—rob the store or have some pie and coffee.

  8. “I couldn’t leave you guys behind.”
    “Of course you could and you nearly did until…”

  9. “The lying part made it all worse.”

  10. “Why didn’t you just come home?”

Leave It to Beaver…actually, Wally

Feeling the need for simplicity and–sighhhh–a trip down memory lane, I called up an episode of Leave It to Beaver. [You do realize life was perfect back then.]

Beaver tells his family that he wants to be a writer.

Ward Cleaver (to Beaver): I think you should do what Somerset Maugham did.
Beaver: Was he a writer?
Wally: With a name like that what do you think he is? A linebacker for the Baltimore Colts?

Classic line, Wally.


Image credit: ABC Television [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Ten Writing Prompts…“I’m telling you for the last time…”

word art ideas circular mind mapGreetings, readers and writers.

Just touching base on this blog with some writing prompts from my third book. I am also repeating the 31-day My 500 Words challenge. It was instrumental last January in my building a more consistent writing habit.

I’ve decided this year that I will direct my daily word count toward a single project I’m working on. Here was today’s post to the group. [Day 3 for me.]

610 words on my project of the month. I’m using the words to work through my process–steps I’m taking toward completion, including my responses to books and resources I’m using to help me. [i.e. Side Hustle by Chris Guillebeau]. Two things are ‘freeing’: 1. This 500-word challenge because Jeff Goins says, ‘Don’t edit!’. 2. The project itself because it is just an experiment anyway, without much skin in the game.

For me, merely completing the project will be the reward.

Here are the prompts:

  1. “Whoa! Hold on there. Don’t start throwing out terms like ‘nutritional’ and ‘organic’ around here!”
  2. “So, you have no alibi and you were the last person to see her alive and you don’t think you should be in this room?”
  3. We were going to let her sit and stew awhile before we delivered the news…
  4. “Please! Take the gun. Just put the accordion down!”
  5. All he ever talked about was food…
  6. We knew we had found his weak spot…
  7. Customers lining up around the corner. Angry customers…
  8. This was not the time to get sentimental…
  9. “You really have no idea where your money comes from, do you?”
  10. “I’m telling you for the last time…”

Note: Always feel free to request a PDF of one of my books of 1000 prompts.

10 Writing Prompts for New Year’s Day


writing prompts word cloud

HAPPY NEW YEAR’S DAY, FOLKS!

ENJOY THE LINK AT THE BOTTOM OF THIS LIST AS WELL.

  1. “This information…would it have to do with my boss?”

  2. “He’s gone missing.”
    “Well, what did you expect?”

  3. How could we turn the tables within a day? It would take help from our friends…and even a few of our enemies.

  4. “Are you sure he didn’t say anything to you about his plans?”

  5. “On the bright side, you have each other!”   We each rolled our eyes.

  6. “There has to be some other way to change her mind.”
    “Nope, I’m afraid you’ll have to…”

  7. We never played well together and this was no exception…

  8. “Let’s try something new this weekend.”
    I reeeeally didn’t like the sound of that.

  9. “We’re still in the research phase.”

  10. “Do you even have any cleaning products?”



50 Creative Writing Ideas to Combat Writer’s Block

from thejohnfox.com

Back to blogging…

newyear-3664197_1280

It’s been awhile.

I didn’t reach 50,000 words in National Novel Writing Month. I don’t care. It started me on a project that I’m sticking to.

I found the 50K goal to be more distracting that inspiring. And for some reason, it took me off my blogging game. Weird.

I won’t do another NANOWRIMO. This year’s effort took the fun out of writing. Kind of an opposite of the intended result. Shrug.

And part of me questioned the value of creating another tome that would–knowing me–just collect dust. [Maybe that was just a loser’s mentality…but it made sense to me.]

In the meantime, I’ll be revisiting some of my favorite blogs that I was following before. Hello, Virginia, Cristian, and Little Fears, among others.

But in the dark of winter, I might even stop in mid-sentence if I sense the approach of sunshine. Post-Christmas through mid-January…Not a favorite time, climate-wise.

Hey, I just hit over 110 words. Not bad. For me.

And over on retirerenew.com, I’m leaning on photos to build a little momentum.

Finally, I like this post entitled 5 Ways to Get Back to Blogging After a Long Break.