Twitter Gems–March 31

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I’ve not been visiting my Twitter feeds lately.
It’s a good place to revisit for a little writer/creator wisdom.

But first, a 1:47 YouTube item.
The Power of Words

1. From Jon Winokur @AdviceToWriters

Always the same advice: learn to trust our own judgment, learn inner independence, learn to trust that time will sort the good from the bad– including your own bad.

DORIS LESSING

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2. Also from Jon Winokur @AdviceToWriters

“As long as you’re curious, hard-working and continue developing your craft, you can keep getting better for a lifetime…”

STEVEN BESCHLOSS

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3 . From Maria Popova  @brainpicker

“However meaningless and vain, however dead life appears, the man of faith, of energy, of warmth … steps in and does something.”

VINCENT VAN GOGH, born on this day in 1853, on fear, taking risks, and how making inspired mistakes moves us forward.

 

 

 

 

Writers, raise your voice!

You can't find your voice if you don't use it.

A few valuable posts on author’s voice…

Reclaiming My Writer’s Voice
by Kay Bolden

My favorite lines from the post:

The keyboard and the screen made it far too easy to distance myself from my words. To sink into sales mode or trope mode or campaign mode. When I write by hand, I lead with my body, not my brain.

How I Found My Writing Voice and How You Can Find Yours:
A Metaphor Involving Sandwiches
by Carly Mae

Some favorite lines from this post:

Our writing is not genuine, we don’t feel like ourselves, or it’s stilted and mechanical — feeling more like a “I have to write” versus “I want to write.”

If you feel that way, you might be lacking your voice.

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The biggest reason your writing feels mechanical and stilted is because it is. It’s not you. So when you read it, it probably sounds fake.

Your audience reads it that way it too.

View at Medium.com

Sharing a writer’s guest post…

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I really liked this post from Cynthia Morris [Rally Your Courage to Write Your Book] on productiveflourishing.com.

Points that resonated:

  • “…we often find a bigger reason for why we’re not writing: lack of confidence.”
  • “I always encourage my clients to write a permission slip.” [=a ‘Yes, you can do this!”]
  • “There are plenty of books in the world. But not your book.

Added value to this post: It really does apply to any ambition to create.

 

Nothing to write about? I don’t think soooooo….

One of my favorite pages from Austin Kleon‘s book Show Your Work ** encourages creators to become ‘documentarians of what you do’.

Whether you share it or not, documenting and recording your process as you go along has its own rewards: You’ll start to see the work you’re doing more clearly and feel like you’re making progress. And when you’re ready to share, you’ll have a surplus of material to choose from.

  1. Research
  2. Reference
  3. Drawings
  4. Plans
  5. Sketches
  6. Interviews
  7. Audio
  8. Photos
  9. Video
  10. Pinboards
  11. Journals
  12. Drafts
  13. Prototypes
  14. Demos
  15. Diagrams
  16. Notes
  17. Inspiration
  18. Scrapbooks
  19. Stories
  20. Collections

**Not an affiliate link. ;-]

Curation Monday

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Interesting thoughts from people much smarter than I am…

#Follow your curiosity and passion. What fascinates you will probably fascinate others. But, even if it doesn’t, you will have devoted your life to what you love…”

Diane Ackerman
http://www.advicetowriters.com/interviews/2012/7/25/diane-ackerman.html

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Jon Winokur

✔@AdviceToWriters

You must once and for all give up being worried about successes and failures…”
–Anton Chekhov

bit.ly/2JA6bql

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Keep A Diary

Keep a diary, but don’t just list all the things you did during the day. Pick one incident and write it up as a brief vignette. Give it color, include quotes and dialogue, shape it like a story with a beginning, middle and end—as if it were a short story or an episode in a novel. It’s great practice. Do this while figuring out what you want to write a book about. The book may even emerge from within this running diary.

–John Berendt

http://www.advicetowriters.com/home/2018/6/2/keep-a-diary.html

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Jordan Rosenfeld @Jordanrosenfeld

Don’t let yourself become bored with your writing or practice. Take #risks. #WritersGuide2Persistence #create

Curation Wednesday: Risk-taking and Writing

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http://ingridsundberg.com/2010/04/02/write-with-reckless-abandon/

Back in 2010, Ingrid Sundberg attended a writing conference and posted her notes from a session Four Rules on Risk Taking and Writing by author Libba Bray.

Some of the highlights:

  1. Explore what we don’t know! We write to open up a whole new conversation with ourselves and the world.
  2. Sit at the kitchen table with your characters. See what they would say.
  3. Beware the thought “Should I….” Follow yourself and not what you think others may want you to be doing.
  4. There is no sure thing other than writing the thing you want to write the most.
  5. If it is not scary then there are no stakes. And if there are no stakes then it is not worth writing.

Thanks to Ingrid Sundberg for sharing this.

 

 

 

 

 

Twitter Gems–June 5

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Twitter Gems

  1.   Jordan Rosenfeld  @Jordanrosenfeld

The more you write, the less fraudulent you’ll feel. This is why I call it a writing practice. #WritersGuide2Persistence #writelife

  1.   Jon Winokur  @AdviceToWriters

First-person narrators is the way I know how to write a #book with the greatest power and chance of artistic success.
ANNE RICE
#amwriting #fiction

  1. Jeff Goins  @JeffGoins

“A good novel tells us the truth about its hero; but a bad novel tells us the truth about its author.” —G.K. Chesterton #amwriting #writingquote

 

Saturday Twitter Gems

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Here’s a funny one:

Jon Winokur 
How do you know if your child is a writer? Your obstetrician holds his stethoscope to your abdomen and only hears excuses.
FRAN LEBOWITZ
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A scene feels purposeful when you give the character that stars in it an intention, or a goal to pursue. #makeAscene

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Hemingway’s advice on writing: In any art you’re allowed to steal anything if you can make it better.”

 

Curation Sunday: Julia Cameron’s The Right to Write

Today, I’m sharing excerpts from Julia Cameron’s varied works. She is the author of 40 fiction and non-fiction books, including The Artist’s Way and Finding Water. Look for curated content from her other works in the future.

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Here are three gems from The Right to Write

“When we ‘forget ourselves’, it is easy to write. We are not standing there, stiff as a soldier, our entire ego shimmied into every capital ‘I’. When we forget ourselves, when we let go of being good, and settle into just being a writer…When we are just the vehicle, the storyteller and not the point of the story, we often write very well—we certainly write more easily.”

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“The trick to finding writing time, then, is to write from love and not with an eye to product…The lies we tell ourselves about writing and time are all connected to envy, to the fairy tale notion that there are others whose lives are simpler, better funded, more conducive to writing than our own.”

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“Early in my writing life, I tried to polish as I went…Writing this way was frustrating, difficult, and disheartening, like trying to write a movie and cut it at the same time.”

“The danger of writing and rewriting at the same time was that it was tied in to my mood. In an expansive mood, whatever I wrote was great. In a constricted mood, nothing was good.”   [Note: I’m pretty sure you can figure out her solution.]