Stuck for writing topics? Visit Quora.

Image by Dean Moriarty from Pixabay 

Okay, so here I sit and there is a dog on the floor beside me who is morally (possibly even biologically) opposed to humans using technology when he’s nearby. In other words, he’s smarter than most humans, including me.

Despite the canine objections…seeing as how I’m well into retirement, I was struck with this thought: At what age does a man become a codger?

So I clicked over to Quora. Lots of ideas and discussion [and ads, but I’m sure you’re as adept as I am at looking past that stuff.]

Then, in the right column ‘Are you a geezer, codger, or coot? caught my eye.

Seemed like a fun little etymology exercise.

And it set off my idea machine [ten ideas ideally on a single topic] exercise for the day:

Find ten writing topics from this page on Quora.

1. When did I become a codger?

2. Does my dog think I’m a codger? [An interview]

And I came across, this guy on Quora, who fed me all kinds of topics—

He says he still believes in ‘silly little things like:

3, “Life is simply a never ending series of decisions.”

4. “We are in control of our destiny, although politicians think they are.”

And my favorite…

5. “Worry is the most egregious mistreatment of imagination that there is.”

This person is also shooting to live to 112 1/2—a source of multiple topics…

6. “What if I knew I’d live that long? How would I live my life right now?”

7. “Do I want to live that long?”

8. “If I knew the exact date, or even month, of my passing, how would I treat those last few months?”

And circling back to the original ‘When did I become a codger?’…

9. Would there be a new classification/label for someone who’s hanging around at 112? 

10. Where would I be warehoused at that age?

11. Would I still have a dog at that age?

12. When should we decide to NOT have a dog? [i.e. don’t want to leave him ownerless/homeless if I should pass—or— don’t want to be so feeble that I can’t take good care of him]

So these are thoughts that might have entered my mind as I celebrated World Baking Day yesterday. Instead, I focused on chocolate chip-peanut butter-cranberry cookies and a fresh loaf of Italian cheese bear bread.

Other stuff I’m doing:

retiredguys.net

and more Goodwill Words Project letters.

Curation for Writers: Become an Idea Machine

Photo by CJ Dayrit on Unsplash

I ran across this photo and it immediately revived my appreciation for Become An Idea Machine by Claudia Azula Altucher and James Altucher.

A few quotes from the book’s foreword by James:

“…idea generation, of the good kind, the kind that helps you AND OTHERS, which is the type you will exercise in this book, is worth ten times that, or more.”

“You can’t trust the old style of thinking anymore…You have to come up with a new way of thinking, a new way of having ideas…we can train it (the mind) to work for us, and to move us in the direction of a life of fulfillment. One day at a time.”

“The way is this: Come up with ten ideas a day.
That’s it.”

“Coming up with ten ideas a day is like exercise. And exercise makes the idea muscle grow stronger.”

***

NOTE: The Kindle version is 99 cents. Yes, 99 cents! For a 251-page ebook with lots of…you guessed it, IDEAS!
The link to the book is an affiliate link. If you happen to buy the book through that link, it doesn’t NOT affect the price, but it does give me a small commission, which I’ll be using to buy my small island in the Caribbean…or the yacht I’ll need to get to that island…or my therapist who’s exhausted himself trying to dispel my daily delusions.

Goodwill Words: April’s More Love Letter requests

Click the graphic above for a quick tour of the four April 2021 letter requests at moreloveletters.com.

It’s interesting…sometimes I dive right into these letters and other times I need the requests’ words and details to seep in. This has been a ‘let seep in’ month.

I do make a point of finishing letters for out-of-country requests first. And over time, I’ve wended my way through the USPS website to figure out the required postage and I have those stamps at the ready.

In James Clear’s words (Atomic Habits)…

“If you want to maximize your odds of success, then you need to operate in an environment that accelerates your results rather than hinders them.”

Curation Corner: Writing freebies from Scribe Media

Welcome to BooskSchool, with links to:

** four self-directed courses covering the topics highlighted in the word cloud above

** a download link to Scribe Media co-founder Tucker Max’s book, The Scribe Method

** a link to Scribe Media’s YouTube Channel

** a link to their podcast

Other Scribe Media resources can be found here.

Enjoy!

Curation Corner: Let Hemingway do the work.

Click here or on the above word cloud for a 90-second run-through of The Hemingway App, an online pair of eyes [creepy, I know] that points out [without browbeating] a writing flaw or two.

Here is an opening sentence I used on another blog…and Hemingway’s feedback. [That hack…I’ve heard he claims to have written The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms.]

You just paste in your masterpiece and out comes the quick but helpful evaluation.

There is also a $20 desktop version.

Note: Thanks to websiteplanet.com for reminding me about The Hemingway App and a few other helpful tools.

Curation Corner: Following up on Writers, Ink

As I was curating for my previous post on podcasts for writers, I ran across Writers, Ink, a team effort of J.D. Barker, J. Thorn, and Zach Bohannon.

When I clicked over to their website, I signed up for the free revision course (see above).

Am hoping it will A. offer some helpful strategies B. nudge me to open some work that needs my attention [i.e. is collecting digital dust].

Hope this help, writers.